Testimonials

Floyd Ricardo Fresquez
Grazing permittee

floyd-ricardo-fresquez

“I am a grazing permittee in the Santa Fe National Forest and Pecos Wilderness and run cattle in the Rio La Casa Allotment in Mora County. My family has run cattle and sheep in the area for three generations, years before New Mexico was recognized as a state. Maintaining these traditional ways of life is most important to me when looking at protecting the land my family has lived on for so many generations.

I was first inspired to protect this land at 18 when I built trails in the Santa Fe National Forest for the Forest Service. A forest ranger by the name of Ismael Mondragon (Mondragon Springs, located in the roadless area in Mora County, is named after Mondragon) said if I could ever be involved in an effort to protect this area, I should do anything in my power to do just that. I am grateful to be part of the Pecos Wilderness campaign and will encourage all my friends and family to be part of this effort.

I also am an heir and board member to the Santa Gertrudis de lo de Mora Land Grant. My family dates back to the mid 1500s on this land and keeping its rich historical and cultural values are most important to me and my family. Expanding the Pecos Wilderness to include the inventoried roadless areas in Mora County is vital to our existence as land-based people. Our water comes from the high mountain peaks of the Pecos Wilderness and expanding these areas will not only protect my allotment from development, but also will keep it available in its current state for my grandchildren and those who will follow.

I would encourage our federal delegation to move forward with increasing the size of the Pecos Wilderness by including all the inventoried roadless areas that have been identified in Mora, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Taos and Rio Arriba counties.”
Grazing permittee

“I am a grazing permittee in the Santa Fe National Forest and Pecos Wilderness and run cattle in the Rio La Casa Allotment in Mora County. My family has run cattle and sheep in the area for three generations, years before New Mexico was recognized as a state. Maintaining these traditional ways of life is most important to me when looking at protecting the land my family has lived on for so many generations.

I was first inspired to protect this land at 18 when I built trails in the Santa Fe National Forest for the Forest Service. A forest ranger by the name of Ismael Mondragon (Mondragon Springs, located in the roadless area in Mora County, is named after Mondragon) said if I could ever be involved in an effort to protect this area, I should do anything in my power to do just that. I am grateful to be part of the Pecos Wilderness campaign and will encourage all my friends and family to be part of this effort.

I also am an heir and board member to the Santa Gertrudis de lo de Mora Land Grant. My family dates back to the mid 1500s on this land and keeping its rich historical and cultural values are most important to me and my family. Expanding the Pecos Wilderness to include the inventoried roadless areas in Mora County is vital to our existence as land-based people. Our water comes from the high mountain peaks of the Pecos Wilderness and expanding these areas will not only protect my allotment from development, but also will keep it available in its current state for my grandchildren and those who will follow.

I would encourage our federal delegation to move forward with increasing the size of the Pecos Wilderness by including all the inventoried roadless areas that have been identified in Mora, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Taos and Rio Arriba counties.”